Our Aims and Objectives

We are the UK association for all those who research, study and teach global development issues

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What is Development Studies

What is development studies, why it matters, how you can study and career prospects

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Our Members

We have around 1,000 members, made up of individuals and around 40 institutions

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Governance

Find out about our constitution and how we are run

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People

Meet our Council members and other stuff who support the running of DSA

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About

The DSA Conference is an annual event which brings together the development studies community

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DSA2021

Our conference this year is themed "Unsettling Development"

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Past Conferences

Find out about our previous conferences

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Study Groups

Our Study Groups offer a chance to connect with others who share your areas of interest

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Students and ECRs

Students and early career researchers are an important part of our community

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Publications

Our book series with OUP and our relationship with other publishers

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North-South Research

A series of workshops exploring North-South interdisciplinary research with key messages and reports

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Membership Directory

Find out who our members are, where they are based and the issues they work on

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New podcast from Robtel Pailey

Robtel Pailey, one of our keynote speakers at DSA2019, has recently recorded a podcast about the nexus between race, development and COVID-19. The podcast is broadcast by the Oxford Society for International Development and available to listen to now on Soundcloud.

Robtel is a Liberian academic, activist and author, and in the podcast she discusses the intersections between her recently published Al Jazeera English commentary, “Africa does not need saving during this pandemic”, and Development and Change journal article, “De-centring the ‘White Gaze’ of Development“. In discussion with Mia Simovic, she uses race as a lens of analysis to interrogate assumptions that Western whiteness and modernity are the primary signifiers of progress and expertise. In exploring the pitfalls of adopting a “colour blind” outlook on development, the podcast also considers how scholars, policy makers and practitioners can challenge the ‘white gaze’ by imagining “a better world beyond flattened curves”.

Robtel’s article in Development and Change – which is based on her keynote – was the Journal’s Top Downloaded Paper in 2019.