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The DSA Conference is an annual event which brings together the development studies community

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DSA2022

Our conference this year is themed "Just sustainable futures in an urbanising and mobile world"

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Plenary speakers

6-8 July 2022: Online Conference at University College London

Just sustainable futures in an urbanising and mobile world

Justice and equity, just futures in an urbanising and mobile world, facing a climate and ecological crisis in a pandemic or post-pandemic context

Meet the DSA2022 Plenary speakers

Jo Beall

Jo Beall

Jo Beall is Emeritus Professor and Distinguished Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). Formerly Director of Education and Cultural Engagement at the British Council and Deputy Vice Chancellor of the University of Cape Town (UCT), she has worked on urban development and urban services, cities in conflict affected and fragile states, women and gender in cities and international higher education issues across Africa and Asia. She has published numerous books and articles, is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the Royal Society of Arts and has an Honorary Doctorate from the Open University.

Event: In-conference Opening Plenary: Urbanising futures and sustainability

Aromar Revi

Aromar Revi

Aromar Revi is the founding Director of the Indian Institute for Human Settlements (IIHS). He is a global practice and thought leader, and educator with over 39 years of interdisciplinary experience in sustainable development, global environmental change, long-term futures, governance, public policy and finance, and urbanisation.

Aromar is a global expert on implementing Sustainable Development; Co-Chair of the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN), where he led a successful global campaign for an urban Sustainable Development Goal (SDG 11) as part of the UN’s 2030 development agenda. This brought together global urban institutions (UN Habitat, UCLG, C-40, ICLEI, Metropolis, Cities Alliance, SDI and WIEGO) and over 300 cities & organisations. He is a member of the UCLG-Ubuntu and policy Advisor to the UCLG Presidency on localisation of the SDGs. UCLG is the global voice and advocate of local and regional governments, representing 0.24 million towns, cities, metropolises and regions across the world. He is also a member of UN-Habitat’ Stakeholder Advisory Group (STAG) which is tasked with global stakeholder engagement (2019-21). Aromar was also a member of the Managing Board of Cities Alliance the global partnership for sustainable cities and urban poverty reduction (2016-19).

Aromar is one of the world’s leading experts on global environmental change, especially climate change. He is a Coordinating Lead Author (CLA) of the synthesis chapter on Climate Resilient Development Pathways of the IPCC Working Group Assessment Report 6 (AR6) on Adaptation, that was released in March 2022. He is also a member of the Core Writing Team (CWT) of AR6 Synthesis Report that will be released in September 2022. He is a CLA of the 2018 IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5 °C. He is also a CLA of the 2018 SR1.5 Summary for Urban Policymakers, and the 2021 Summary for Financial Decisionmakers.

He is one of South Asia’s most experienced risk and disaster management professionals and has been a member of the Advisory Board of UNDRR’ Scientific & Technical Advisory Group (STAG) and its bi-annual Global Assessment of Risk (GAR), from 2008. He has led the design for UNDRR of the Coalition for Disaster Resilient Infrastructure (CDRI) a global partnership to promote the resilience of infrastructure systems to climate and disaster risks.

Event: In-conference Opening Plenary: Urbanising futures and sustainability

William E. Rees

William E. Rees

William Rees is a population ecologist, ecological economist, Professor Emeritus and former Director of the University of British Columbia’s School of Community and Regional Planning. His research focuses on the biophysical requirements for sustainability and the implications of global ecological trends for the human prospect. He has special interests in cities as particularly vulnerable components of the human ecosystem and in psycho-cognitive barriers to rational ‘environmental’ behaviour, including sound public policy for sustainability. Prof Rees is perhaps best known as the originator and co-developer (with his graduate students) of ‘ecological footprint analysis’ which shows that the world is in far overshoot—we would need four Earth-like planets to support just the present world population at North American material standards. Dr Rees has authored hundreds of peer reviewed and popular articles on these topics.  He is a founding member and former President of the Canadian Society for Ecological Economics; a founding Director of the One Earth Initiative; and a Fellow of the Post-Carbon Institute. Internationally recognized, Prof Rees is a Fellow of Royal Society of Canada, recipient of a Trudeau Foundation Fellowship and both the international Boulding Prize in Ecological Economics and a Blue Planet Prize (jointly with Dr Mathis Wackernagel).  From 2014 to 2019 Dr Rees was a full member of the Club of Rome; in 2015 he received the 2015 Herman Daly award from the US Society for Ecological Economics; and, in 2016, was awarded a Dean’s Medal of Distinction from UBC’s Faculty of Applied Science.

Event: In-conference Opening Plenary: Urbanising futures and sustainability

Yvonne Su

Yvonne Su

Dr. Yvonne Su is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Equity Studies at York University. Dr. Su is a specialist on forced migration, queer migration, migrant remittances, climate change-induced displacement, social capital, and post-disaster recovery. She holds a PhD in Political Science and International Development from the University of Guelph and a Masters in Refugee and Forced Migration Studies from the University of Oxford. Dr. Su’s research is supported by four SSHRC grants that examine Brazil and Colombia’s response to Venezuelan LGBTQI+ asylum seekers, the impact of COVID-19 on Venezuelan LGBTQI+ asylum seekers in Brazil and impact of COVID-19 on disaster-affected households in resettlement areas in Tacloban City, Philippines.

Event: In-conference Plenary 2: Climate crisis, migration, and responses

Mark Swilling

Mark Swilling

Mark Swilling is Distinguished Professor of Sustainable Development in the School of Public Leadership, University of Stellenbosch. The primary research focus of his career can be defined as ‘societal transitions’, initially with respect to democratization and governance up until the late 1990s, and subsequently within the wider discipline of sustainability studies. The dynamics of urban change has always been a consistent theme. his published research was coupled to major institution-building collaborations – an achievement that was recognized in 2010 when he was awarded the Aspen Faculty Pioneer Award for success in introducing sustainability into leadership education. His most significant academic output is his book entitled Age of Sustainability: Just Transitions in a Complex World (Routledge 2019). This builds on the co-authored book with Eve Annecke entitled Just Transitions: Explorations of Sustainability in an Unfair World (United Nations Press 2012) that was awarded runner-up prize for the Harold & Margaret Sprout Award in 2013 for best academic book in the environmental governance field – this being the first time African researchers have been recognized by this award since its inception in 1972. In recent years he has increased his participation in international research collaborations, particularly via UN institutions (International Resource Panel 2007-2019) and several Scientific Committees of international conferences, including the Scientific Committee of the International Sustainable Development Research Conference for the years 2011, 2012 and 2013, as well as member of the International Review Panel of the Biennial Conferences of the International Society for Ecological Economics (ISEE) in 2010 and 2014. In 2014 he was appointed by the Minister of Finance as a Board member of the Development Bank of Southern Africa (Chairperson of the Board from January-September 2019 and again from November 2021). In 2015 he was invited to become a fellow of the World Academy of Art and Science. In 2016 he was appointed ‘advisor to the curator’ of the International Architecture Biennale Rotterdam (IABR) and in 2017 – 2019 I convened the State Capacity Research Project on the dynamics of state capture in South Africa. In 2020 he was invited to become a member of the prestigious Club of Rome – the oldest sustainability think tank, founded in 1968.He was formally appointed as Distinguished Professor of Sustainable Development and Co-Director of the Centre for Sustainability Transitions (CST).

More information from his website: https://www.markswilling.co.za/about/

Event: In-conference Closing Plenary: Just sustainable futures and knowledge production

Kevin Lo Tek Sheng

Kevin Lo Tek Sheng

Kevin Lo is Assistant Professor of Geography and Associate Director of David C. Lam Institute for East-West Studies (LEWI) at Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU). He is a political and urban geographer with expertise in the interdisciplinary fields of environmental studies and energy studies. He has won several major competitive grants from the Research Grants Council (RGC) of Hong Kong, including the Early Career Scheme (ECS) and the General Research Fund (GRF), and has published over 90 peer-reviewed articles in leading journals, including Global Environmental Change, Political Geography, Geoforum, Energy Research & Social Science, Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Energy Policy, Energy for Sustainable Development, Environmental Science & Policy, Cities, Habitat International, and Journal of Rural Studies. In 2018, he found the Journal of Asian Energy Studies, an international peer-reviewed journal dedicated to interdisciplinary research on all aspects of energy studies in Asia.

Event: In-conference Closing Plenary: Just sustainable futures and knowledge production

Farhana Sultana

Farhana Sultana

Dr. Farhana Sultana is Professor in the Department of Geography and the Environment at the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs of Syracuse University, where she is also the Research Director for Environmental Collaboration and Conflicts at the Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflicts and Collaboration (PARCC). Dr. Sultana is an internationally recognized interdisciplinary scholar of political ecology, post‐colonial development, water governance, climate justice, transnational feminism, and decolonizing academia. Her research and scholar-activism draw from her experiences of having lived and worked on three continents as well as from her backgrounds in the natural sciences, social sciences, and policy experience. Prior to joining Syracuse, she taught at King’s College London and worked at United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). Author of several dozen publications, her third book is “Water Politics: Governance, Justice, and the Right to Water” (Routledge, 2020). Dr. Sultana graduated Cum Laude from Princeton University (in Geosciences and Environmental Studies) and obtained her Masters and PhD (in Geography) from the University of Minnesota, where she was a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Fellow. In recognition for “outstanding contributions to geographic research on social issues”, she was awarded the Glenda Laws Award from the American Association of Geographers in 2019.

Event: In-conference Closing Plenary: Just sustainable futures and knowledge production

Gautam Bhan

Gautam Bhan

Gautam Bhan is Associate Dean, School of Human Development, as well as Senior Lead, Academics and Research, School of Human Development at the Indian Institute for Human Settlements, Bangalore. He holds a PhD in City and Regional Planning, University of California, Berkeley.  At IIHS, Gautam teaches, researches and writes on the politics of urban poverty and inequality, urban and planning theory, housing, and identity and social practice. He anchors IIHS’ work as a Centre for Excellence with the Ministry of Housing and Urban Affairs, as well as a knowledge partner to urban movements for housing rights. As part of the School of Human Development at IIHS, he also leads work on urban welfare regimes, social protection and informal work. New projects include work on child health outcomes for the children of informal workers in domestic work and construction, as well as advocacy work on urban social protection regimes. He is widely published. Most recently, he is the author of In the Public’s Interest: Evictions, Citizenship and Inequality in Contemporary Delhi (University of Georgia Press 2017; Orient Blackswan 2017) and co-editor (with Smita Srinivasan and Vanessa Watson) of the Routledge Companion to Planning in the Global South (Routledge 2018).

Event: Pre-conference Webinar 1: The politics and governance of sustainable urban futures

Susan Parnell

Susan Parnell

Susan Parnell is a Professor in the School of Geography at the University of Bristol and Emeritus Professor at the African Centre for Cities (ACC) at the University of Cape Town. She has been actively involved in local, national and global urban policy debates around the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals, leading the push for an urban goals, and is an advocate for better science policy engagement on cities. Her publications focus on how cities, past and present, respond to policy change. Her most recent books include the co-authored Building a Capable State: Post Apartheid Service Delivery (Zed, 2017) and the co-edited The Urban Planet (Cambridge, 2018) and Localising SDGs in African Cities (Springer, 2022).

Event: Pre-conference Webinar 1: The politics and governance of sustainable urban futures

Mona Fawaz

Mona Fawaz

Mona Fawaz is Professor in Urban Studies and Planning at the American University of Beirut where she has co-founded the Beirut Urban Lab, a regional research center invested in working towards more inclusive, just, and viable cities. Mona’s research spans across urban history and historiography, social and spatial justice, informality and the law, land, housing, property and space. She is the author of over 50 scholarly articles, book sections, and reports in Arabic, French and English. She has also worked as a consultant, advising on urban and regional development as well as housing, land, and property issues. In addition, Mona has been tightly involved in Beirut’s ongoing transformations by publishing in the local press and speaking in numerous local venues where she has advocated for upgrading informal settlements, protecting the urban commons, improving urban livability, adopting more inclusive planning standards, and more generally, defending the right to the city for the urban majorities. Mona holds a BArch (1995) from the American University of Beirut, a MCP (1998) and Ph.D. (1994) in Urban Studies and Planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She was a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute of Advanced Studies at Harvard University during the 2014/15 academic year and in Summer 2017. She has served on numerous national, regional and international juries, including the Aga Khan awards in 2019. She is also member of the editorial board of the journals Planning Theory, the International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, and City and Society.  

Event: Pre-conference Webinar 1: The politics and governance of sustainable urban futures

Shahaduz Zaman

Shahaduz Zaman

Professor Shahaduz Zaman has an interdisciplinary background with degrees in Medical Anthropology, Public Health and Medicine. He has more than 15 years of experience in conducting research and teaching in global public health. His research interests include hospital ethnography, Socio-cultural aspects of communicable and non-communicable diseases, death dying and end of life, refugee health, role of art in heath interventions, health policy and health systems in low income countries and medical history. Shahaduz Zaman conducted research in Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Vietnam, Turkey, Tunisia, Lebanon, and Syria. He has received research grants from ESRC, AHRC, MRC, British Academy and WHO.

Before joining as a Senior Lecturer and then Reader in Medical Anthropology and Global Health at the Department of Global Health and Infection at BSMS, he worked with School of Interdisciplinary Studies, University of Glasgow and Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle University. Shahaduz Zaman obtained his Ph.D. in Medical Anthropology from University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands in 2003. He obtained his Public Health and Medical degree from Bangladesh. Shahaduz Zaman was born and brought up in Bangladesh, and started his career as a community health physician in the rural parts of the country.

Before moving to UK in 2009 he was working at the James P. Grant School of Public Health, BRAC University, Bangladesh as an Associate Professor. Shahaduz Zaman is also a notable fiction writer in Bengali literature and the recipient of the ‘Bangla Academy Award 2016’ which is the highest national literary award in Bangladesh.

Event: Pre-conference Webinar 2: 50 years of non-governmental public action: learning from the BRAC experience

Asif Saleh

Asif Saleh

Asif Saleh is the Executive Director of BRAC. He brings a multi-sectoral experience in senior leadership roles in private, public, and non-government arenas, with a proven track record of effectively managing development programming, operational and financial sustainability, and building effective partnerships.

Prior to joining BRAC, he was a policy specialist for the Prime Minister’s Office’s Access to Information (A2i) programme. He spent 12 years in Goldman Sachs, ending his term as Executive Director. He has also worked in Glaxo Wellcome, IBM, and Nortel. Asif founded Drishtipat, a global organisation which focuses on human and economic rights of Bangladeshis. He is an active member in a range of international alliances, including Millions Learning International Advisory Group, Brookings Institute, and Innovation Edge. Asif was selected as a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum in 2013. Asif chairs BRAC IT Services Limited, co-chairs BRAC Net, and is on the Board of BRAC Bank, and edotco Bangladesh Ltd. He is also a board member of multiple non-profits, including Institute of Informatics and Development, and Maya. Asif holds a bachelor’s degree in computer science and an MBA from the Stern School of Business, New York University.

Event: Pre-conference Webinar 2: [email protected]: what can we learn from the world’s largest NGO?

Tamara Abed

Tamara Abed

Tamara Hasan Abed is the Managing Director of BRAC Enterprises heading BRAC’s ten social enterprises. She chairs the board of BRAC University and sits on multiple boards of various BRAC investments. Ms Abed brings with her extensive experience in investment banking, entrepreneurship and social enterprise and is passionate about driving value-based business models, operating at the intersection of social good, sustainable business and inclusive growth. Ms Abed began her career in investment banking in 1995, at Peregrine Capital Ltd, and later worked for Goldman Sachs in Mergers and Strategic Advisory. She has been with BRAC since 2002. Ms Abed was honoured by the World Economic Forum as a ‘Young Global Leader’ in 2010. Ms Abed is an Asia 21 Young Leader and received the Outstanding Women Leadership Award from the World Women Leadership Congress in 2014.

Ms Abed has an MBA in Finance from Columbia Business School and a BSC (Honours) in Economics from the London School of Economics and Political Science.

Event: Pre-conference Webinar 2: [email protected]: what can we learn from the world’s largest NGO?

Marty Chen

Marty Chen

Martha (Marty) Chen is a Lecturer in Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School and Co-Founder, Emeritus International Coordinator and Senior Advisor of the global network Women in Informal Employment: Globalizing and Organizing (www.wiego.org). An experienced development practitioner and scholar, her areas of specialization are employment, gender and poverty with a focus on the working poor in the informal economy. Before joining Harvard in 1987, she had two decades of resident development experience working in Bangladesh (with the NGO BRAC) and in India (as field representative of Oxfam America). Dr. Chen co-founded and, for twenty years, led the WIEGO network which is well known worldwide for its work to improve the status of the working poor in the informal economy through stronger organizations, improved statistics and research and a more favorable policy environment. Dr. Chen received a PhD in South Asia Regional Studies from the University of Pennsylvania. She was awarded a high civilian award, the Padma Shri, by the Government of India in April 2011; and a Friends of Bangladesh Liberation War award by the Government of Bangladesh in December 2012. Currently, she is chair of the boards of the United Nations University World Institute for Development Economics Research (UNU WIDER) and BRAC Global.

Event: Pre-conference Webinar 2: [email protected]: what can we learn from the world’s largest NGO?

Sohela Nazneen

Sohela Nazneen

Sohela Nazneen has 17 years of experience working on gender and development issues. Her research focuses on gender and politics, feminist movement, women’s empowerment and violence against women in South Asia and sub Saharan Africa.

Before joining IDS, Sohela was a faculty member at the Department of International Relations, University of Dhaka, and a Research Fellow based at BRAC Institute of Governance and Development, BRAC University, in Bangladesh. She worked as a consultant- designing gender and development interventions, conducting programme evaluations and gender policy analysis for the FAO, UNDP, SDC, Irish Aid, The Asia Foundation, The McArthur Foundation, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation-among others.

At IDS, Sohela leads IDS’ Strategic Research Initiative areas on ‘Resisting backlash against gender equity, social justice and civic space,’ and is the convenor of IDS’ flagship MA programme on Gender and Development. She is the political economy lead for the ESRC funded project ‘Sustaining Power: Women’s Struggles Against Contemporary Backlash in South Asia’ and co-ordinates the research in Bangladesh and Nepal.

Event: Pre-conference Webinar 2: [email protected]: what can we learn from the world’s largest NGO?

Nobonita Chowdhury

Nobonita Chowdhury

Nobonita Chowdhury is the Director of Gender Justice & Diversity Programme at BRAC and is responsible for spearheading the mainstreaming of gender perspectives across the organization. Ms Chowdhury holds over two decades of outstanding experience in journalism, media and communications and has worked for leading electronic and print media organisations including the BBC in the UK. She rose to nationwide prominence in Bangladesh, hosting her own primetime talk show. She has been invited to speak at the Plenary Session of the World Press Freedom Day Global Conference in Addis Ababa, organised by the UNESCO in 2019. Ms Chowdhury holds an MA in Human Rights Law from School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London, and an LLB (Hons) from University of Dhaka.

Event: Pre-conference Webinar 2: [email protected]: what can we learn from the world’s largest NGO?

Syed Hashemi

Syed Hashemi

Syed M Hashemi has a long career in teaching, research and managing programs for the poor. He taught Economics at Jahangirnagar University in Bangladesh, directed an anti-poverty research program at Grameen Trust, and set up a development institute and chaired the Department of Economics and Social Sciences at BRAC University. He spent nine years with CGAP, at the World Bank, focusing on financial inclusion of the poorest and ensuring a social performance bottom line in microfinance. He also designed and headed a successful multi-country program to develop new pathways for the poorest to graduate out of extreme poverty through integrating safety nets, livelihood activities and financial services. Hashemi continued to work on an expanded agenda of Economic Inclusion as a Senior Advisor to the Partnership for Economic Inclusion, at the World Bank. He has recently joined BRAC University as Professor at the School of General Education.

Event: Pre-conference Webinar 2: [email protected]: what can we learn from the world’s largest NGO?

Aude Montesquiou

Aude Montesquiou

Aude de Montesquiou is Senior Advisor at BIGD. She works on scaling economic inclusion through digital innovations and provides overall support in strategy, fundraising and communications. Before joining BIGD in 2021, Aude spent 15 years at the World Bank Group, first at CGAP and then as Social Protection Specialist at the World Bank’s Social Protection and Jobs Global Practice. From 2008 to 2016 Aude was the Task Team Leader for the CGAP-Ford Foundation Graduation Program, overseeing the design and implementation of 10 pilot programs in eight countries and coordinating quantitative and qualitative research. From 2016-2020, Aude co-led the start-up of the Partnership for Economic Inclusion at the World Bank, a Global Partnership supporting the scaling of economic inclusion programs through governments. She jointly led the team that produced the World Bank’s State of Economic Inclusion 2021 and is the author of many seminal publications and technical guides on economic inclusion and graduation.

Event: Pre-conference Webinar 2: [email protected]: what can we learn from the world’s largest NGO?

Greg Chen

Greg Chen

As Managing Director, Greg Chen leads BRAC Ultra-Poor Graduation Initiative’s strategy to scale the Graduation approach. Prior to joining BRAC, Chen was the Policy Lead at Consultative Group to Assist the Poor (CGAP), focusing on hands-on advisory and implementation with microfinance institutions and engaging governments and regulators across Africa and Asia. He has also worked on rural livelihoods in remote northern Pakistan for the Aga Khan Rural Support Programme and provided advisory services to dozens of institutions on behalf of ShoreBank International, now Palladium Impact Capital. Chen has more than 25 years of experience in financial inclusion with a master’s degree in international development from Harvard’s Kennedy School and a bachelor’s degree from Wesleyan University.

Event: Pre-conference Webinar 2: [email protected]: what can we learn from the world’s largest NGO?

Franciso de Assis Comarú

Franciso de Assis Comarú

Francisco de Assis Comarú is Associate Professor at the Federal University of ABC (UFABC) in São Paulo, Brazil, where he leads the Territorial Justice Laboratory (LabJuta). With a Masters in urban engineering, a PhD in public health at University of São Paulo and post docs at The Bartlett’s DPU UCL (London) and ILO (Geneva), Francisco has academic and professional experience in consultancy to social movements, urban and environmental planning and management and housing policies. His research, teaching and public engagement activities focus on urban policies; central metropolitan areas; public health; popular and environmental education; territorial public policies and decent work.

Event: Pre-conference Webinar 3: What role for the university in bringing about just sustainable futures?

Mona Harb

Mona Harb

Mona Harb is Professor of Urban Studies and Politics at the American University of Beirut where she is co-founder and research lead at the Beirut Urban Lab. Her research investigates governance and territoriality in contexts of contested sovereignty, urban activism and oppositional politics, and spatial practices in fragmented cities. She is the author of Le Hezbollah à Beirut: de la banlieue à la ville, co-author of Leisurely Islam: Negotiating Geography and Morality in Shi’i South Beirut (with Lara Deeb), co-editor of Local Governments and Public Goods: Assessing Decentralization in the Arab World (with Sami Atallah), and co-editor of Refugees as City-Makers (with Mona Fawaz et al.). She serves on the editorial boards of MELG, IJMES, EPC, and CSSAME.

Event: Pre-conference Webinar 3: What role for the university in bringing about just sustainable futures?

Zarina Patel

Zarina Patel

Zarina Patel is Associate Professor of Human Geography at the University of Cape Town. Her research addresses the politics and practices of achieving just and sustainable urban transitions, focusing on transdisciplinary approaches to navigate alternate insights and responses to complex urban issues in southern contexts. Her publications on sustainable urban transitions and urban knowledge include joint authorship collaborations with knowledge brokers beyond the academy, foregrounding the diversity of knowledges that are recognized as authoritative in these debates. She is the Principal Investigator of the project The New African Urban University, funded by the Worldwide Universities Network Research Development Fund. By engaging partners from the global north and south, this project aims to set the agenda for a more global and inclusive understanding of the scope of systems changes required by universities in Africa to advance SDG 11. Zarina is an editor of Environmental Planning F and former Editor in Chief of Urban Forum, she serves on the editorial boards of Local Environment, and Urban Sustainability.

Event: Pre-conference Webinar 3: What role for the university in bringing about just sustainable futures?

Neha Sami

Neha Sami

Neha Sami is Associate Dean- School of Environment and Sustainability at the Indian Institute of Human Settlements (IIHS). Her research focuses on the governance of infrastructure, especially mega-infrastructure in the context of post-liberalization urban India, as well as environmental governance, particularly at the sub-national scale, focusing on institutional analysis and state capacity. She teaches on questions of governance and sustainability and anchors the Research Programme at IIHS. Her research has been published in the Economic and Political Weekly, International Journal for Urban and Regional Research (IJURR), and Land Use Policy, as well as through contributions to several edited volumes. She is a Corresponding Editor for the International Journal of Urban and Regional Research and has served on the Editorial Collective of Urbanization. She holds a Ph.D. in Urban Planning from the University of Michigan, a Master’s degree in Environmental Management from the Yale School of the Environment and a B.A. in Economics from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Event: Pre-conference Webinar 3: What role for the university in bringing about just sustainable futures?